The options for steroidal creams both prescrip Which one to choose is going to depend on first what a dermatologist recommends, the age of the sufferer and the severity of the atopic dermatitis. Non-Steroidal prescription creams can include Atopiclair, Elidel and MimyX. The most widely used non-prescription creams are 1% hydrocortisone creams such as Cortaid Maximum Strength or Cortizone-10 Maximum Strength but can be it can also be found in generic store brand versions and at lower strengths. All these creams have a chance of side effects including burning, stinging, redness and irritation in which case a dermatologist should be consulted.

The most widely used non-prescription creams are 1% hydrocortisone creams such as Cortaid Maximum Strength or Cortizone-10 Maximum Strength but can be it can also be found in generic store brand versions and at lower strengths.

Non-prescription 1% hydrocortisone creams such as Cortaid Maximum Strength and Cortizone-10 Maximum Strength or their generic store brand versions are designed for the temporary relief of itching, the main complaint of atopic dermatitis. It is used for mild cases of atopic dermatitis as a preventive measure. Often in mild cases if the itching can be managed then the flare-ups can be prevented. It is not recommend for sufferers under the age of two and should only be used to treat active symptoms of mild atopic dermatitis. There are stronger versions available by prescription only for more severe cases.

The options for steroidal creams both prescrip Which one to choose is going to depend on first what a dermatologist recommends, the age of the sufferer and the severity of the atopic dermatitis. Non-Steroidal prescription creams can include Atopiclair, Elidel and MimyX. The most widely used non-prescription creams are 1% hydrocortisone creams such as Cortaid Maximum Strength or Cortizone-10 Maximum Strength but can be it can also be found in generic store brand versions and at lower strengths. All these creams have a chance of side effects including burning, stinging, redness and irritation in which case a dermatologist should be consulted.

The most widely used non-prescription creams are 1% hydrocortisone creams such as Cortaid Maximum Strength or Cortizone-10 Maximum Strength but can be it can also be found in generic store brand versions and at lower strengths.

Non-prescription 1% hydrocortisone creams such as Cortaid Maximum Strength and Cortizone-10 Maximum Strength or their generic store brand versions are designed for the temporary relief of itching, the main complaint of atopic dermatitis. It is used for mild cases of atopic dermatitis as a preventive measure. Often in mild cases if the itching can be managed then the flare-ups can be prevented. It is not recommend for sufferers under the age of two and should only be used to treat active symptoms of mild atopic dermatitis. There are stronger versions available by prescription only for more severe cases.

There are many non-steroidal creams for the treatment of atopic dermatitis on the market today. Which one to choose is going to depend what a dermatologist recommends based on the age of the sufferer and the severity of the atopic dermatitis. Non-Steroidal prescription creams can include Atopiclair, Elidel and MimyX. All these creams have a chance of side effects including burning, stinging, redness and irritation in which case a dermatologist should be consulted.

Atopiclair is new to the market. It acts as a barrier to the inflamed areas and helps protect it from additional irritants. It also speeds up the healing process by providing a protective, moister rich environment for the skin to heal in. Its efficiency in helping with atopic dermatitis has been shown to be great in clinical trials. It can be used to prevent atopic dermatitis flare-ups or control those already in progress. It has been approved for sufferers of all ages.

Elide or its generic counter part Pimecrolimus is a non-steroidal cream that it used to treat mild to moderate atopic dermatitis in sufferers two or older. It is thoroughly rubbed into the affected skin to control inflammation and itching. It has been approved to be used anywhere, including the face, neck and around eyes. It is meant to be used for short periods to clear up symptoms because the affects of long term use are not yet known. It is recommended to limit sun exposer even between uses because skin will be more sensitive.

MimyX Cream is preservative and fragrance free. It has a water-based formula that helps relieve the itching and burning involved in atopic dermatitis. The cream helps symptoms by keeping the skin and wound moist. Usually the cream is applied 3 times a day or as needed by massaging it in to affected areas. It can be used on sufferers of any age and for any duration. The cream can also be applied to all areas of skin. There is a warning about sun exposer but it is to state the MimyX does not help protect from the sun but also does not cause additional sun sensitivity. Although it is recommend to avoid direct sunlight right after application.

There are also some non-prescription cream options that do not contain steroids but are just to help control itching and dryness. They can be an effective preventive measure for mild atopic dermatitis and in many cases if the itching can be kept under control then the flare-ups may not occur. These creams can include Eucerin, Nivea, Cethaphil Moisturizing Cream and Lubriderm. For the great results they need to be used daily, even if there are no symptoms of atopic dermatitis and worked best if rubbed on the entire body after bathing.

There are many oral medications that can help relieve the symptoms of atopic dermatitis. Some of them are antihistamines, oral corticosteroids, cyclosporine and interferon. Also oral anti-fungal, antibiotics and antiviral medications can be given when an atopic dermatitis out brake has become infected. When combined with creams made for atopic dermatitis these oral medications are very effective in relieving its symptoms.

There are many antihistamines on the market today. Some may cause drowsiness and are best used to control itching while sleeping, such as Benadryl (diphenhydramine), Vistaril (hydroxyzine) and Zyrtec (cetirizine) which is the least sedating. Others that do not cause drowsiness, such as Allegra (fexofenadine) or Claritin (loratadine) can be used at any time. The amount of antihistamine can be altered to work with each individual sufferer and while they can not stop atopic dermatitis the can provide some relief of symptoms.

Antihistamines can be effective in treating the itch associated with atopic dermatitis because they block histamines that are causing the allergic reaction. Because all cases of atopic dermatitis can not be attributed to histamines, antihistamines may not give relief to all sufferers. A doctor should be consulted before giving children any type of antihistamines. Antihistamines that sedate have been given to children to help not scratch in their sleep and make their atopic dermatitis worse.

As with all oral medications antihistamines are not with out possible side effects. As stated before, they can cause drowsiness but also in some cases there is dry nose, mouth and throat. Also weakness, blurred vision, and stomach problems. Antihistamines should not be taken to individuals with epilepsy as they increase the risk of seizure.

Oral corticosteroids (prednisone and prednisolone) may be given when an atopic dermatitis out brake is severe and is spread over a significant portion of the body. They are given to children older than two as well as adults. Corticosteroids simulate naturally occurring steroids the body makes to decrease itching and inflammation. When given for atopic dermatitis they help resolved the lichenification (thickening) of the skin. They are usually given at first in a high dose to get the rash in check and then tapered off. They almost always have side effects such as stomach problem, loss of appetite, headaches, mood changes, frequent urination and extreme thirst. Due to the rate at which these side effects occur, corticosteroids are reserved for severe cases and often as a last resort.

Cyclosporine or interferon are used in severe adult cases and only when no other forms of treatments have been successful. Cyclosporine is an oral medication while interferon is injected under the affected areas of skin. They both work by suppressing the immune system and blocking the bodies ability to cause inflammation. They must be used with close doctor supervision due to the increased risk of infection. They can also cause kidney issues and elevated blood pressure. It is recommenced that direct sun light be avoided while using cyclosporine or interferon because the skin will be more vulnerable to skin cancer.

When a rash becomes infected additional medications may need to be given to clear it up before the actual atopic dermatitis can be treated. If it is a viral infections such as herpes simplex, it will be treated with an oral antiviral medication. In cases of bacterial infections the sufferer will be given antibiotics. Antibiotics may be used on an ongoing basis if the frequent out brakes of atopic dermatitis can be attributed to bacteria    collecting on the skin. In some cases the are fungal infections that need to be treated with anti-fungal medications. Being sure to keep rashes clean and nails clipped with cut down on instances of infection.

Do not forget that even though atopic dermatitis is a challenging disease, it is completely manageable. Through proper care and management sufferers can still maintain normal lives and not let atopic dermatitis interfere in their activities. To manage this disease a plan of action needs to be in place. There are many factors they need to be considered in this plan.

Getting control over your itching, a natural part of the disease that leads to sever scratching, is the first step. The scratching breaks the skins surface. These breaks in the skin allow in irritants and infections that cause inflammation. To control scratching it is best to wear light cotton clothing and avoid scratchy material such as wool. You should also apply moisturizing cream several times a day and keep you hands busy to avoid scratching.

When washing clothes and bedding be careful what you wash them in the proper soap. Taking care of what soaps you use can help you avoid irritants that cause outbreaks. Only hypoallergenic soaps free of dyes, perfumes and preservative should be used. It is also important to wash all new clothing before wearing them to rid them of irritating chemicals often  found in new clothing.

Atopic dermatitis sufferers should avoid extreme temperatures.  If it is too hot there will be excessive sweaty that can irritate the skin. Cold weather can dry skin out by itself then there is the added dryness of constantly running your furnace. It is best to keep you environment at a comfortable temperature and level of humidity. If you swim be sure to shower off all chlorine when done and apply moisturizer promptly.

It is vital that you keep an eye out for skin infections. They are a dangerous problem of atopic dermatitis. They can become very serious if not treated quickly and can cause permanent damage. When watching for infections look out for skin that is overly reddened, puss filled bumps, ooze and honey colored blisters or scabs. If you suffer from any of these signs it is important to get to a physician or dermatologist as soon as possible to prevent permanent damage.

There are three levels of atopic dermatitis, mild, moderate and severe. Sufferers can usually tell which level they are  at by the severity of the rash and how much of their body if affected. Through out the course of the disease sufferers may fluctuate between levels. Mild cases may be able to be managed with out the intervention of a healthcare professional. When the atopic dermatitis becomes moderate and most certainly when it becomes severe, it is time to get professional help in managing the disease.

When infants experience atopic dermatitis it can affect each baby differently depending on their age and how severe their symptoms are. If they show signs of atopic dermatitis in infancy it generally manifest itself between the ages of six to twelve weeks. It first appears on the chin and cheeks as a patchy rash and if not handled properly can become inflamed and oozy. Since most over the counter and prescription medications are not recommended for children under two years, infant cases of atopic dermatitis can be difficult to treat.

Since infants under two have have fewer treatment options they have a higher risk of infection. Keeping their nails clipped and using mittens at night will help cut down on infections cause by scratching. When infants become mobile and start to crawl the rash may spread to exposed areas that rub as they move such as the outer parts of the arms and legs. They can be restless and irritable due to the itching that atopic dermatitis causes.

Since treatments for infants are limited first thing parents should do it try to avoid outbreaks as much as possible. This is done through carefully observing what causes an outbreak since each child is different. Once the triggers are found the can be avoided.

Laundry detergent is a major irritant so be sure to wash all clothing in a soap free of dyes and fragrances such as Dreft. It is important to remember to also wash their bedding and your clothes in it as well. Any material in your home that may come in contact with the infants skin should be washed in the hypoallergenic detergent.

How the infant is dressed has a great affect on outbreaks as well. Avoid dressing the infant, or anyone else they may come in contact with, in wool or any other harsh material. These material can rub against already irritated skin and cause serious inflammation. Also it is best to avoid over dressing the infant or putting to many blankets on them because excessive sweating can increase irritation in the skin as well.

Regardless of the cause of the outbreak, proper skin care is vital for control inf infant atopic dermatitis. Proper skin care begins with the frequency of bathing. Infants should only be given a full bath every other day. On the off days it is recommended that they be given a sponge bath with a cleanser designed for sensitive skin such as Cetaphil. The infants skin is simply cleaned with a wash cloth that contains the cleanser and the another that does not to rinse. However a bath is given it is vital to moisturize the skin with a lotion for sensitive skin which Cetaphil also produces and Eucerin is widely used too.

Prescription creams are not recommended for infants under two but may be prescribed in sever cases. Otherwise, to help combat itching 0.5% hydrocortisone cream can be used but a dermatologist and/or pediatrician should be consulted before using any over the counter medication on an infants atopic dermatitis. For diaper areas regular diaper rash cream can be helpful.

It has been found that atopic dermatitis has both genetic and external environmental causes that lead to out brakes and determine their severity. There are currently three major theories on the specific genetic causes of atopic dermatitis.  First there is the theory that a genetic defect causes the immune system to weaken and affects its ability to handle environmental factors.  Second, is that a genetic issue causes sufferers outer layer of skin to develop improperly. Third, atopic dermatitis is an allergy just like hay fever or asthma. It could also be a combination of these factors. What ever the cause may be the evidence always points to an extremely strong genetic factor. While there is an increasing amount of evidence to support the theory that atopic dermatitis is genetic, all facts of the disease have not been fully understood yet.

A person’s immune system develops with in the first six month of life. It is believed that through a genetic defect the immune system of suffers of atopic dermatitis are weaker than those with out the disease. People with the disease have been found to have an extra amount of immunoflobulin E (IgE), an antibody (special protein) that manages the allergic reaction of the immune system. When a person has an increased level of IgE their immune system over reacts to soaps, clothing and other environmental factors that affect the skin. With only 80-90 percent of atopic dermatitis sufferers having these increase levels it can not account for all cases.

Evidence is emerging that atopic dermatitis is the result of a genetic skin deficiency or barrier defect in the outer layer of skin. Failures in this barrier cause the skin to be more permeable so it absorbs more irritants and allergens than normal skin. This defect also causes the skin to have a reduced amount of natural moisturizers and unbalanced pH levels resulting in dry skin that can be increased by environmental factors.

Atopic dermatitis is strongly linked to other allergies. Almost all sufferers also experience other atopic disorders such as hay fever, seasonal allergies and asthma. It is believed that people who have these disorders have what some researchers call the allergy gene. Anyone with this gene most likely has one of the following: atopic dermatitis, hay fever, seasonal allergies, asthma or any combination.

While all causes of atopic dermatitis proposed to date include strong genetic links, external forces are just as much of a contributing factor, especially in the severity of flare ups. There are many factors that suffers can be exposed to that will increase flare ups and their severity. Bathing too often, especially in hot water, and swimming chlorinated pools dries skin out. Winter weather and low humidity levels exasperates already dry skin Using soaps and detergents or wearing materials not specified for sensitive skin can irritate it.

Skin care is the first step in a treatment plan for atopic dermatitis. Many of the issue with itching that leads to the inflamed rashes can be skipped simply by taking better care of the skin. To avoid the terrible cycle of itching, scathing and rash that is atopic dermatitis skin must be kept moisturizes and free of irritants.

People with atopic dermatitis must keep their skin hydrated. While researchers may not know the direct cause of atopic dermatitis they do know that keeping skin from becoming dry cuts down on breakouts considerably. Keeping the skin properly hydrate makes it less susceptible to irritants and sets the foundation for other topical treatments such as creams and emollients.

To prevent skin from drying out during the bathing process it is best to take showers but if a bath is unavoidable keep it to 3-5 minutes and make sure the water is not hot. Even when you do shower you need to still not take to long, 10 minutes top, and still keep the water temperature moderate. Soap should be used as sparingly as possible and only in areas that really needed. When using soap it is best to use ones that are specially made for sensitive skin. They will be free of dyes, fragrances and preservatives which are all irritants to atopic dermatitis skin. Avoid the use of bath oils, bubble baths, wash clothes and loofahs because they keep the skin from properly absorbing moister.

When you are done with your shower or bath do not rub your skin dry, instead gently pat dry it to retain as much moister as possible. Once you have sufficiently dried yourself you will want to apply a moisturizing cream that is also hypoallergenic, such as Eucerin or Cetaphil, with in 3 minutes to lock in that moisture. You also want to apply this moisturizer several times throughout the day.

Perfume soaps and lotions should never be used because they can cause severe allergic reactions. Also be careful what blends of material you allow in contact with your skin. Wool and other scratchy materials should be avoided. Instead stick with cotton and other breathable materials. Keep the skin free of perspiration with help cut down on reactions. This also means avoiding the heat of the day. The weather can have a drastic effect on the skin especially the cold winters. Cold weather itself and the heaters we use to warm up dry skin out very quickly. It is recommended that a humidified be set on low and continuously used during months that the heater is used to keep the moister levels in your homes air up.

Unfortunately there is no cure for atopic dermatitis but it is manageable. There are several treatment options for atopic dermatitis. The course of treatment prescribed is going to be different depending on the kind of rash and its severity. Usually a combination of treatments is used to get atopic dermatitis under control, first to stop the itching and then to clear it up. Normally an atopic dermatitis out brake can be cleared up in about 3 weeks but once again it depends on the severity.

There are four main options dermatologists can suggest for treating atopic dermatitis out brakes. What is prescribed will depend on the patient’s age and how extensive the atopic dermatitis is at the time. A more aggressive treatment may initially be prescribed to clear up a brake out and then brought back down for maintenance

Topical corticosteroids are creams and ointment used on the skin. They include hydrocortisone, betamethasone, and fluticasone. They can be used to both clear up an atopic dermatitis out brake and to prevent future out brakes.

Antihistamines are used in many cases of atopic dermatitis because of they are used to stop the itching caused by the condition. Scratching an inflamed area can cause infection so antihistamine can be crucial in preventing infections associated with the condition. Although not all atopic dermatitis itching is cause by histamines so antihistamines may not be helpful for all sufferers of the condition.

Calcineurin inhibitors are topical treatments that work by weakening your body’s immune system so flare ups of atopic dermatitis from happening. Most popular are Elidel a pimecrolimus cream and Protopic at tacrolimus ointment.  Since it they do weaken your immune system they are only recommended if other forms of treatment have been unsuccessful. It should be used with caution and has not been approved for atopic dermatitis sufferers under the age of two.

If an area affected by atopic dermatitis becomes infected oral medications such as antibiotics, antiviral and antifungal medications or a combination may be prescribed to get it under control. When the atopic dermatitis is severe enough or is not being managed by other treatments, there are further options for treatments.

Exposing the effected areas to UV (ultra violent) lights in a doctor’s office is another option. There are two widely used methods of UV therapy. Basic phototherapy is when the effected areas are exposed to UVA, UVB or both lights. Phototherapy can be done with or with out topical medications.  Another common form is psoralen plus ultraviolet light therapy, also know as PUVA. PUVA is the exposure of effected areas to UVA light in conjunction with the use of psoralen which makes the skin more sensitive to the UV lights.

High strength oral and topical corticosteroids can be prescribed for a short period to regain control of a severe atopic dermatitis flare up. These treatments are usually reserved for cases where the atopic dermatitis covers large areas of the body and can not be controlled with the less powerful versions.

Some times in adults more powerful immune system suppressants such as cyclosporine or interferon will be prescribed. Since suppressing a person’s immune system to this degree can be dangerous, these treatments are only done with close physician monitoring. If the out brake is severe enough a short hospital stay may be required.

Most people believe that atopic dermatitis is a rash, when it is actually an itch that when scratched or rubbed against causes a rash. If the itching can be prevented or properly controlled the likelihood and severity of a flare up can be managed. Atopic dermatitis, also known as eczema, is a widespread, persistent disease of the skin. While there currently is no cure it is completely manageable. Simply put dermatitis means a skin inflammation and atopic refers to the genetic component of the disease. The hallmarks of the disease are dry, itchy skin with red, inflamed, swollen areas that can be cracked and crusty.

It can be diagnosed at any time but the largest numbers of diagnoses are given to children under the age of two. Most of the time atopic dermatitis reveals itself through flare ups that are then followed by times of remission. Even during times that there is not a visible rash, skin is still extremely dry and requires special care because it is easily irritated. While it is estimated that 20 percent of children are diagnosed, less than half that amount still suffer from atopic dermatitis when they reach adolescents but most always continue to battle issues with dry skin.

The causes for atopic dermatitis are still being debated but all who research the subject agree that there is a genetic factor. Some believe there is a genetic disposition to a weakened immune system where the weak immune system makes the skin unable to fight off irritants. Then there are those that believe that it is a hereditable defect in the top layer of skin that causes the skin to absorb more allergens and pollutants as well as have less natural moister and unbalanced pH levels. Last there is what some researchers call the allergy gene that causes carries to have a genetic predisposition to atopic dermatitis as well as hay fever, seasonal allergies, asthma or any combination of the four. Since no one theory has been proven to cause all cases of atopic dermatitis, it is possible that one or more of them may be the cause.

There are several external and environmental factors that can cause or increase the severity of a flare up. Allergies and pollutants in detergents aggravate the skin causing flare ups and exasperating current ones. Soaps or skin products dry skin out. Bathing habits, how frequent and how hot of water is used also can cause dry skin. While exposure to cold weather and lack of moisture are also contributing factors. Dry skin can increase the itchiness and there for increase scratching that leads to inflammation.

Atopic dermatitis cure – does such a thing exist? Unfortunately, currently there is no cure for atopic dermatitis, as well as there is no cure for similar genetic conditions, such as psoriasis, vitiligo, and others.

Even though there is no atopic dermatitis cure, there are numerous methods and ways to improve this devastating condition. There is something for everyone, including self care, dietary alterations, and the use of the prescription medications.

Self Care Options

Atopic dermatitis requires the sufferers to be very cautious about their lifestyle. First of all, if your domestic duties or your occupation is associated with the frequent exposure to water, fragrances, detergents or chemicals, then the best thing to do is to try to avoid any contact with the possible irritants. Most people will not be able to just change their profession, but you may want to ensure that there is no contact of your skin with any possible irritants, such as by wearing protective gloves, etc.

Avoid wearing clothes made of harsh fabrics, and avoid washing your clothes in any potentially dangerous detergents. In fact, there are special hypo-allergic detergents available on the market, which you may want to look into.

There are also special anti-bacterial treated bedclothes that you may want to try instead of your regular bedclothes.

Dietary Alterations

There are two main approaches to making your diet better to suit your condition: eliminating the “bad” foods from your diet, and adding the “good” foods to your diet. When it comes to atopic dermatitis, the usual suspects include: cow’s milk, eggs, soy products, and peanuts. The foods that are claimed to be beneficial include Borage oil and Evening Primrose oil – the sources of GLA acid that you may be lacking in your diet.

Prescription Medications

Prescription medications for atopic dermatitis cure include: topical steroids, oral steroids, and Calcineurin inhibitors.

When testing a topical steroid cream, it’s better to start with the least potent medication such as an over the counter 1% Hydrocortisone cream. Since the affected areas of the people with atopic dermatitis are generally the areas with thin skin, any medication will absorb fast and work well.

Oral corticosteroids (prednisone) are generally prescribed in the worst cases, such as when large areas of the body are covered with rashes, or at the time of a severe flare up. The course of oral steroids is generally very short (5-7 days), and topical steroids may come next in the treatment to maintain the achieved effect.

Even thought there is no Atopic dermatitis cure, there are numerous ways to make your life better.